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Data from: Evaluation of the innate immunostimulatory potential of originator and non-originator copies of insulin glargine in an in vitro human immune model

Citation

Luna, Ernesto et al. (2019), Data from: Evaluation of the innate immunostimulatory potential of originator and non-originator copies of insulin glargine in an in vitro human immune model, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.6hf1pc1

Abstract

Background: The manufacture of insulin analogs requires sophisticated production procedures which can lead to differences in the structure, purity, and/or other physiochemical properties of resultant products that can affect their biologic activity. Here, we sought to compare originator and non-originator copies of insulin glargine for innate immune activity and mechanisms leading to differences in these response profiles in an in vitro model of human immunity. Methods: An endothelial/dendritic cell-based innate immune model was used to study antigen-presenting cell activation, cytokine secretion, and insulin receptor signalling pathways induced by originator and non-originator insulin glargine products. Mechanistic studies included signalling pathway blockade with specific inhibitors, analysis of the products in a Toll-like receptor reporter cell line assay, and insulin removal from the products by immunopurification. Findings: All insulin glargine products elicited at least a minor innate immune response comparable to human insulin, but some lots of a non-originator copy product induced the elevated secretion of the cytokines, IL-8 and IL-6. In studies aimed at addressing the mechanisms leading to differential cytokine production by these products, we found (1) the inflammatory response was not mediated by bacterial contaminants, (2) the innate response was driven by the insulin receptor through the MAPK pathway, and (3) the removal of insulin significantly reduced their capacity to induce innate activity. No evidence of product aggregates was detected, though the presence of some high molecular weight proteins argues for the presence of insulin dimers or others contaminants in these products. Conclusion: The data presented here suggests some non-originator insulin glargine product lots drive heightened in vitro human innate activity and provides preliminary evidence that changes in their biochemical composition (dimers, impurities) might be responsible for their greater immunostimulatory potential.

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