Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: A tilt after-effect for images of buildings: evidence of selectivity for the orientation of everyday scenes

Citation

Hussain Ismail, Ahamed Miflah; Solomon, Joshua A.; Hansard, Miles; Mareschal, Isabelle (2016), Data from: A tilt after-effect for images of buildings: evidence of selectivity for the orientation of everyday scenes, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.6pv38

Abstract

The tilt after-effect (TAE) is thought to be a manifestation of gain control in mechanisms selective for spatial orientation in visual stimuli. It has been demonstrated with luminance-defined stripes, contrast-defined stripes, orientation-defined stripes and even with natural images. Of course, all images can be decomposed into a sum of stripes, so it should not be surprising to find a TAE when adapting and test images contain stripes that differ by 15° or so. We show this latter condition is not necessary for the TAE with natural images: adaptation to slightly tilted and vertically filtered houses produced a ‘repulsive’ bias in the perceived orientation of horizontally filtered houses. These results suggest gain control in mechanisms selective for spatial orientation in natural images.

Usage Notes