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Data from: Consequences of multiple mating-system shifts for population and range-wide genetic structure in a coastal dune plant

Citation

López-Villalobos, Adriana; Eckert, Christopher G. (2017), Data from: Consequences of multiple mating-system shifts for population and range-wide genetic structure in a coastal dune plant, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.6q0q4

Abstract

Evolutionary transitions from outcrossing to selfing can strongly affect the genetic diversity and structure of species at multiple spatial scales. We investigated the genetic consequences of mating system shifts in the North American, Pacific coast dune endemic plant Camissoniopsis cheiranthifolia (Onagraceae) by assaying variation at 13 nuclear (n) and six chloroplast (cp) microsatellite (SSR) loci for 38 populations across the species range. As predicted from the expected reduction of effective population size (Ne) caused by selfing, small-flowered, predominantly selfing (SF) populations had much lower nSSR diversity (but not cpSSR) than large flowered, predominantly outcrossing (LF) populations. The reduction of nSSR diversity was greater than expected from the effects of selfing on Ne alone, but could not be accounted for by indirect effects of selfing on population density. Although selfing should reduce gene flow, SF populations were not more genetically differentiated than LF populations. We detected five clusters of nSSR genotypes and three groups of cpSSR haplotypes across the species range consisting of parapatric groups of populations that usually (but not always) differed in mating system, suggesting that selfing may often initiate ecogeographic isolation. However, lineage-wide genetic variation was not lower for selfing clusters, failing to support the hypothesis that selection for reproductive assurance spurred the evolution of selfing in this species. Within three populations where LF and SF plants coexist we detected genetic differentiation among diverged floral phenotypes suggesting that reproductive isolation (probably postzygotic) may help maintain the striking mating system differentiation observed across the range of this species

Usage Notes

Location

Oregon
Species' entire geographic range along the coast of Baja California Mexico
California
USA.