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Data from: A novel method of comparing mating success and survival reveals similar sexual and viability selection for mobility traits in female tree crickets.

Citation

Ercit, Kyla; Gwynne, Darryl T. (2016), Data from: A novel method of comparing mating success and survival reveals similar sexual and viability selection for mobility traits in female tree crickets., Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.6qq65

Abstract

The relationship between sexual and viability selection in females is necessarily different than that in males, as investment in sexual traits potentially comes at the expense of both fecundity and survival. Accordingly, females do not usually invest in sexually-selected traits. However direct benefits obtained from mating, such as nuptial gifts, may encourage competition among females and subsidize investment into sexually-selected traits. We compared sexual and viability selection on female tree crickets Oecanthus nigricornis, a species where females mate frequently to obtain nuptial gifts and sexual selection on females is likely. If male choice determines female mating success in this species, we expect sexual selection for fecundity traits, as males of many species prefer more fecund females. Alternatively, intrasexual scramble or combat competition on females may select for larger jumping legs or wider heads (respectively). We estimated mating success using microsatellite analysis of stored sperm, and estimated relative viability by comparing surviving female O. nigricornis to those captured by a common wasp predator. In support of the scramble competition hypothesis, we found sexual selection for females with larger hind legs and narrower heads. We also found stabilizing viability selection for intermediate head width and hind leg size. As predicted, traits under viability and sexual selection were very similar, and the direction of that selection was not opposing. However, since the shape of sexual and viability selection differs, these episodes of selection may favour different trait sizes.

Usage Notes

Location

Southern Ontario