Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Island biogeography at the meso-scale: distance from forest edge affects choice of patch size by ovipositing treefrogs

Citation

Resetarits, William; Potts, Kevin; Scott, Reed (2022), Island biogeography at the meso-scale: distance from forest edge affects choice of patch size by ovipositing treefrogs, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.6t1g1jx1v

Abstract

Diversity in habitat patches is partly driven by variation in patch size, which affects extinction, and isolation, which affects immigration. Patch size also affects immigration as a component of patch quality. In wetland ecosystems, where variation in patch size and inter-patch distance is ubiquitous, relationships between size and isolation may involve trade-offs. We assayed treefrog oviposition at three patch sizes in arrays of two types, one where size increased with distance from forest (dispersed), and one with all patches equidistant from forest (equidistant), testing directly for an interaction between patch size and distance, which was highly significant. Medium patches in dispersed arrays received more eggs than those in equidistant arrays as use of typically preferred larger patches was reduced in dispersed arrays. Our results demonstrate a habitat selection trade-off between preferred large and less-preferred medium patches across small-scale variation in isolation. Such patch size/isolation relationships are critical to community assembly and to understanding how diversity is maintained within a metapopulation and metacommunity framework, especially as wetland habitat becomes increasingly rare and fragmented. These results bring lessons of Island Biogeography, writ large, to bear on questions at small scales where ecologists often work, and where habitat restoration is most often focused.

Methods

See manuscript and readme file.

Funding

Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation