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Data from: Phosphate is a potential biomarker of disease severity and predicts adverse outcomes in acute kidney injury patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy

Citation

Jung, Su-Young J et al. (2019), Data from: Phosphate is a potential biomarker of disease severity and predicts adverse outcomes in acute kidney injury patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.6v0j9

Abstract

Hyperphosphatemia is associated with mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease, and is common in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI); however, its clinical implication in these patients is unknown. We conducted an observational study in 1144 patients (mean age, 63.2 years; male, 705 [61.6%]) with AKI who received continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) between January 2009 and September 2016. Phosphate levels were measured before (0 h) and 24 h after CRRT initiation. We assessed disease severity using various clinical parameters. Phosphate at 0 h positively correlated with the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II; P < 0.001) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA; P < 0.001) scores, and inversely with mean arterial pressure (MAP; P = 0.02) and urine output (UO; P = 0.01). In a fully adjusted linear regression analysis for age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), MAP, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), higher 0 h phosphate level was significantly associated with high APACHE II (P < 0.001) and SOFA (P = 0.04) scores, suggesting that phosphate represents disease severity. A multivariable Cox model also showed that hyperphosphatemia was significantly associated with increased 28-day (HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08, P = 0.001) and 90-day (HR 1.05, 95% CI 1.02-1.08, P = 0.001) mortality. Furthermore, patients with increased phosphate level during 24 h were at higher risk of death than those with stable or decreased phosphate levels. Finally, c-statistics significantly increased when phosphate was added to a model that included age, sex, CCI, body mass index, eGFR, MAP, hemoglobin, serum albumin, C-reactive protein, and APACHE II score. This study shows that phosphate is a potential biomarker that can reflect disease severity and predict mortality in critically ill patients receiving CRRT.

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