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Data from: The evolution of coexistence: reciprocal adaptation promotes the assembly of a simple community

Citation

Bassar, Ronald D. et al. (2016), Data from: The evolution of coexistence: reciprocal adaptation promotes the assembly of a simple community, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.70fg7

Abstract

Species coexistence may result by chance when co-occurring species do not strongly interact or it may be an evolutionary outcome of strongly interacting species adapting to each other. While patterns like character displacement indicate that coexistence has often been an evolutionary outcome, it is unclear how often the evolution of coexistence represents adaptation in only one species or reciprocal adaptation among all interacting species. Here we demonstrate a strong role for evolution in the coexistence of guppies and killifish in Trinidadian streams. We experimentally recreated the temporal stages in the invasion and establishment of guppies into communities that previously contained only killifish. We combined demographic responses of guppies and killifish with a size-based integral projection model to calculate the fitness of the phenotypes of each species in each of the stages of community assembly. We show that guppies from locally adapted populations that are sympatric with killifish have higher fitness when paired with killifish than guppies from allopatric populations. This elevated fitness involves effects traceable to both guppy and killifish evolution. We discuss the implications of our results to the study of species coexistence and how it may be mediated through eco-evolutionary feedbacks.

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Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: EF0623632