Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Noradrenergic projections from the locus coeruleus to the amygdala constrain fear memory reconsolidation

Citation

Haubrich, Josué; Bernabo, Matteo; Nader, Karim (2020), Data from: Noradrenergic projections from the locus coeruleus to the amygdala constrain fear memory reconsolidation, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.70rxwdbtq

Abstract

Memory reconsolidation is a fundamental plasticity process in the brain that allows established memories to be changed or erased. However, certain boundary conditions limit the parameters under which memories can be made plastic.  Strong memories do not destabilize, for instance, although why they are resilient is mostly unknown. Here, we extend the understanding of the mechanisms implicated in reconsolidation-resistant memories by investigating the hypothesis that specific modulatory signals shape memory formation into a state that lacks lability. We find that the activation of the noradrenaline-locus coeruleus system (NOR-LC) during strong fear memory encoding increases molecular mechanisms of stability at the expense of lability in the amygdala. Preventing the NOR-LC from modulating strong fear encoding results in the formation of memories that can undergo reconsolidation within the amygdala and thus are vulnerable to post-reactivation interference. Thus, the memory strength boundary condition on reconsolidation is set at the time of encoding by the action of the NOR-LC.