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Data from: Sweepstake evolution revealed by population-genetic analysis of copy-number alterations in single genomes of breast cancer

Citation

Kato, Mamoru et al. (2017), Data from: Sweepstake evolution revealed by population-genetic analysis of copy-number alterations in single genomes of breast cancer, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.71jp0

Abstract

Single-cell sequencing is a promising technology that can address cancer cell evolution by identifying genetic alterations in individual cells. In a recent study, genome-wide DNA copy numbers of single cells were accurately quantified by single-cell sequencing in breast cancers. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed genetically distinct populations, each consisting of homogeneous cells. Bioinformatics methods based on population genetics should be further developed to quantitatively analyse the single-cell sequencing data. We developed a bioinformatics framework that was combined with molecular-evolution theories to analyse copy-number losses. This analysis revealed that most deletions in the breast cancers at the single-cell level were generated by simple stochastic processes. A non-standard type of coalescent theory – the multiple-merger coalescent model – aided by approximate Bayesian computation fit well with the data, allowing us to estimate the population-genetic parameters in addition to false-positive and false-negative rates. The estimated parameters suggest that the cancer cells underwent sweepstake evolution, where only 1 or very few parental cells produced a descendant cell population. We conclude that breast cancer cells successively substitute in a tumour mass, and the high reproduction of only a portion of cancer cells may confer high adaptability to this cancer.

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