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Data from: Metabolic programming mediated by an essential fatty acid alters body composition and survival skills of a marine fish

Citation

Fuiman, Lee A.; Perez, Kestrel O. (2015), Data from: Metabolic programming mediated by an essential fatty acid alters body composition and survival skills of a marine fish, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.74cj2

Abstract

Metabolic programming occurs when variations in nutrition during a specific developmental window result in long-term metabolic effects. It has been studied almost exclusively in humans and other mammals but never in an ecological context. Here, we report metabolic programming and its functional consequences in a marine fish, red drum. We demonstrate that maternal provisioning of eggs with an essential fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), varies with DHA content of the maternal diet. When offspring are reared on a DHA-replete diet, whole-body DHA content of offspring depends upon the amount of DHA that was in the egg. We further demonstrate that whole-body DHA content is correlated with traits related to offspring fitness (escape responses, routine swimming, growth, and survival). DHA content of red drum eggs produced in nature is in the range where the effects of metabolic programming are most pronounced. Our findings indicate that during a brief developmental window DHA plays a role in establishing the pathways for its own uptake or storage, with protracted and possibly permanent effects on ecologically important survival skills of individuals and important implications for dynamics of populations and food webs.

Usage Notes

Location

Gulf of Mexico