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Data from: Species ecological similarity modulates the importance of colonization history for adaptive radiation

Citation

Tan, Jiaqi; Yang, Xian; Jiang, Lin (2017), Data from: Species ecological similarity modulates the importance of colonization history for adaptive radiation, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.75pr0

Abstract

Adaptive radiation is an important evolutionary process, through which a single ancestral lineage rapidly gives rise to multiple newly formed lineages that specialize in different niches. In the first-arrival hypothesis, David Lack emphasized the importance of species colonization history for adaptive radiation, suggesting that the earlier arrival of a diversifying species would allow it to radiate to a greater extent. Here, we report on the first rigorous experimental test of this hypothesis, using the rapidly evolving bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 and six different bacterial competitors. We show that the earlier arrival of P. fluorescens facilitated its diversification. Nevertheless, significant effects of colonization history, which led to alternative diversification trajectories, were observed only when the competitors shared similar niche and competitive fitness with P. fluorescens. These results highlight the important role of species colonization history, modified by their ecological differences, for adaptive radiation.

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Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1257858, DEB-1342754