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Data from: Constant and cycling incubation temperatures have long-term effects on the morphology and metabolic rate of Japanese quail

Citation

Ben-Ezra, Noah; Burness, Gary (2017), Data from: Constant and cycling incubation temperatures have long-term effects on the morphology and metabolic rate of Japanese quail, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.76qt1

Abstract

Incubation temperature can have profound effects on growth and development of embryos and young birds. However, few studies have examined the role that cycling incubation temperature may play in phenotypic variation and whether these effects persist to adulthood. We incubated Japanese quail eggs at control temperatures (37.5°C), at low temperatures (36.0°C), and under a cyclical treatment that maintained the same average temperature as the low treatment (36.0°C) with high temperatures that were the same as the control (37.5°C) and low temperatures that still allowed for development of the embryo (28.0°C). Individuals in the low treatment group were smaller in mass and size than individuals in the control group but had an increased basal metabolic rate relative to individuals in the cyclical treatment group. Temperature cycling offset the effects of low incubation temperatures on metabolic rate and embryonic development but not the effects on adult mass and size. Although Japanese quail are sexually size dimorphic, with females larger than males, we could detect no evidence of sex-specific sensitivity to suboptimal incubation temperatures. These results highlight the importance of incubation temperature and pattern as sources of morphological and physiological variation of adult birds.

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