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Data from: Oxidative damage and antioxidant defence are assay and tissue dependent both in captive and in wild-caught bank voles (Myodes glareolus) before and after reproduction

Citation

Ołdakowski, Łukasz; Taylor, Jan R.E.; Taylor, Jan R. E. (2019), Data from: Oxidative damage and antioxidant defence are assay and tissue dependent both in captive and in wild-caught bank voles (Myodes glareolus) before and after reproduction, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.779k1h4

Abstract

1. Reproduction is costly and life-history theory predicts that current parental investment will result in lower survival or decreased future reproduction. The physiological mechanisms mediating the link between reproduction and survival are still under debate and elevated oxidative damage during reproduction has been proposed as a plausible candidate. 2. Previous studies of oxidative stress during reproduction in animals under natural conditions have been restricted to analyses of blood. Herein, we measured the level of oxidative damage to lipids (thiobarbituric-acid-reactive substances) and proteins (carbonyls) in the liver, kidneys, heart and skeletal muscles in free-living bank vole females from spring and autumn generations, before and after reproduction. Antioxidant defence in the liver and kidneys was also determined. We expected oxidative damage to tissues and hypothesized that the damage would be more uniform between tissues in wild animals compared to those breeding under laboratory conditions. 3. Considering all combinations of markers/tissues/generations, oxidative damage in females did not differ before and after reproduction in 12 comparisons, was lower after reproduction in 3 comparisons, and was higher after breeding in one comparison. The total glutathione was significantly increased after reproduction only in the liver of the autumn generation and there was no change in catalase activity. 4. Our results confirm – for the first time in the field – previous observations from laboratory studies that there is no simple link between oxidative stress and reproduction and that patterns depend on the tissue and marker being studied. Overall however, our study does not support the hypothesis that the cost of reproduction in bank voles is mediated by oxidative stress in these tissues.

Usage Notes

Location

Poland