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Data from: Dissection by genomic and plumage variation of a geographically complex hybrid zone between two Australian non-sister parrot species, Platycercus adscitus and P. eximius

Citation

Shipham, Ashlee et al. (2018), Data from: Dissection by genomic and plumage variation of a geographically complex hybrid zone between two Australian non-sister parrot species, Platycercus adscitus and P. eximius, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.794436q

Abstract

The study of hybrid zones advances understanding of the speciation process, and approaches incorporating genomic data are increasingly used to draw significant conclusions about the impact of hybridisation. Despite the progress made, the complex interplay of factors that can lead to substantially variable hybridisation outcomes are still not well understood, and many systems and/or groups remain comparatively poorly studied. Our study aims to broaden the literature on avian hybrid zones, investigating a potentially geographically and temporally complex putative hybrid zone between two native Australian non-sister parrot species, the pale-headed and eastern rosellas (Platycercus adscitus and P. eximius, respectively). We analysed six plumage traits and >1400 RADseq loci and detected hybrid individuals and an unexpectedly complex geographic structure. The hybrid zone is larger than previously described due either to observer bias or its movement over recent decades. It comprises different subregions where genetic and plumage signals of admixture vary markedly in their concordance. Evidence of contemporary hybridisation (later generation and backcrossed individuals) both within and beyond the previously defined zone, when coupled with a lack of F1 hybrids and differential patterns of introgression among potentially diagnostic loci, indicates a lack of post-zygotic barriers to gene flow between species. Despite ongoing gene flow, species boundaries are likely maintained largely by strong pre-mating barriers. These findings are discussed in detail and future avenues for research into this system are proposed which would be of benefit to the speciation and hybrid zone literature.

Usage Notes

Location

Australia