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Data from: Transgressive physiological and transcriptomic responses to light stress in allopolyploid Glycine dolichocarpa (Leguminosae)

Citation

Coate, Jeremy E.; Powell, Adrian F.; Owens, Tom G.; Doyle, Jeff J. (2012), Data from: Transgressive physiological and transcriptomic responses to light stress in allopolyploid Glycine dolichocarpa (Leguminosae), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7b2d9

Abstract

Allopolyploidy is often associated with increased photosynthetic capacity as well as enhanced stress tolerance. Excess light is a ubiquitous plant stress associated with photosynthetic light harvesting. We show that under chronic excess light, the capacity for non-photochemical quenching (NPQmax), a photoprotective mechanism, was higher in a recently formed natural allotetraploid (Glycine dolichocarpa, designated ‘T2’) than in its diploid progenitors (G. tomentella, ‘D3’; and G. syndetika, ‘D4’). This enhancement in NPQmax was due to an increase in energy-dependent quenching (qE) relative to D3, combined with an increase in zeaxanthin-dependent quenching (qZ) relative to D4. To explore the genetic basis for this phenotype, we profiled D3, D4 and T2 leaf transcriptomes and found that T2 overexpressed genes of the water–water cycle relative to both diploid progenitors, as well as genes involved in cyclic electron flow around photosystem I (CEF-PSI) and the xanthophyll cycle, relative to D4. Xanthophyll pigments have critical roles in NPQ, and the water–water cycle and CEF-PSI are non-photosynthetic electron transport pathways believed to facilitate NPQ formation. In the absence of CO2, T2 also exhibited greater quantum yield of photosystem II than either diploid, indicating a greater capacity for non-photosynthetic electron transport. We postulate that, relative to its diploid progenitors, T2 is able to achieve higher NPQmax due to an increase in xanthophyll pigments coupled with enhanced electron flow through the water–water cycle and CEF-PSI.

Usage Notes

Location

Papua New Guinea
Taiwan
Australia