Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Social associations between California sea lions influence the use of a novel foraging ground

Citation

Schakner, Zachary A.; Blumstein, Daniel T.; Petelle, Matthew B. (2017), Data from: Social associations between California sea lions influence the use of a novel foraging ground, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7d80n

Abstract

Social relationships define an individual's position in its social network, which can influence the acquisition and spread of information and behavioural variants through the population. Thus, when nuisance behaviours spread through wildlife populations, identifying central individuals may provide valuable insights for problem-species management. We studied the effects of network position on California sea lion (Zalophus californianus) discovery and foraging success at a novel foraging ground—the salmonids that aggregate at the Bonneville Dam tail-race, 235 km up the Columbia River. We found that an individual's centrality in their social network influenced discovery of the Bonneville Dam and whether they returned the next year. Foraging success once at the dam was independent of network position. Extensive lethal and non-lethal removal efforts have been implemented at Bonneville Dam and focused on reducing the number of individual sea lions at the dam. Since social relationships forged at the opening of the Columbia River influence both the discovery and return to the Bonneville Dam, efforts to increase salmon recovery may be enhanced by breaking apart social networks at the opening of the river.

Usage Notes