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Data from: Genetic and physiological data suggest demographic and adaptive responses in complex interactions between populations of figs (Ficus pumila) and their pollinating wasps (Wiebesia pumilae)

Citation

Wang, Hurng-Yi et al. (2013), Data from: Genetic and physiological data suggest demographic and adaptive responses in complex interactions between populations of figs (Ficus pumila) and their pollinating wasps (Wiebesia pumilae), Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7df61

Abstract

To study interactions between host figs and their pollinating wasps and the influence of climatic change on their genetic structures, we sequenced cytoplasmic and nuclear genes and genotyped nuclear microsatellite loci from two varieties of Ficus pumila, the widespread creeping fig and endemic jelly fig, and from their pollinating wasps, Wiebesia pumilae, found in Taiwan and on nearby offshore islands. Great divergence in the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) with no genetic admixture in nuclear markers indicated that creeping- and jelly-fig wasps are genetically distinct. Compared with creeping-fig wasps, jelly-fig wasps also showed better resistance under cold (20 °C) than warm (25 and 30 °C) conditions in a survival test, indicating their adaptation to a cold environment, which may have facilitated population expansion during the ice age as shown by a nuclear intron and 10 microsatellite loci. An excess of amino acid divergence and a pattern of too many rare mtCOI variants of jelly-fig wasps as revealed by computer simulations and neutrality tests implied the effect of positive selection, which we hypothesize was associated with the cold-adaptation process. Chloroplast DNA of the two fig plants was completely segregated, with signs of genetic admixture in nuclear markers. As creeping- and jelly-fig wasps can pollinate creeping figs, occasional gene flow between the two figs is thus possible. Therefore, it is suggested that pollinating wasps may be playing an active role in driving introgression between different types of host fig.

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