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Data from: Re-evaluating the geological evidence for Late Holocene marine incursion events along the Guerrero Seismic Gap on the Pacific Coast of Mexico

Citation

Bianchette, Thomas A.; McCloskey, Terrence A.; Liu, Kam-biu (2017), Data from: Re-evaluating the geological evidence for Late Holocene marine incursion events along the Guerrero Seismic Gap on the Pacific Coast of Mexico, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7ff11

Abstract

Despite the large number of tsunamis that impact Mexico's Pacific coast, stratigraphic studies focusing on geological impacts are scanty, making it difficult to assess the long-term risks for this vulnerable region. Surface samples and six cores were taken from Laguna Mitla near Acapulco to examine sedimentological and geochemical evidence for marine incursion events. Sediment cores collected from behind the beach barrier are dominated by intercalated layers of peat and inorganic sediments, mostly silt and clay, with little or no sand. Sand- and shell-rich clastic layers with high levels of sulfur, calcium, and strontium only occur adjacent to the relict beach ridge remnants near the center of the lagoon. With the exception of one thin fine sand layer, the absence of sand in the near-shore cores and the predominance of the terrigenous element titanium in the inorganic layers, evidently eroded from the surrounding hillslopes, suggests that these large-grained intervals do not represent episodic marine incursions, but rather were likely formed by the erosion and redeposition of older marine deposits derived from the beach ridge remnants when water levels were high. These results do not support the occurrence of a large tsunami event at Laguna Mitla during the Late Holocene.

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