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Data from: Reproductive and behavior dysfunction induced by maternal androgen exposure and obesity is likely not gut microbiome-mediated

Citation

Lindheim, Lisa et al. (2018), Data from: Reproductive and behavior dysfunction induced by maternal androgen exposure and obesity is likely not gut microbiome-mediated, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7h4338m

Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine and metabolic disorder of unclear etiology in women and is characterized by androgen excess, insulin resistance, and mood disorders. The gut microbiome is known to influence conditions closely related with PCOS, and several recent studies have observed changes in the stool microbiome of women with PCOS. The mechanism by which the gut microbiome interacts with PCOS is still unknown. We used a mouse model to investigate if diet-induced maternal obesity and maternal dihydrotestosterone (DHT) exposure, mimicking the lean and obese PCOS women, cause lasting changes in the gut microbiome of offspring. Fecal microbiome profiles were assessed using Illumina paired-end sequencing of 16S rRNA gene V4 amplicons. We found sex-specific effects of maternal and offspring diet, and maternal DHT exposure on fecal bacterial richness and taxonomic composition. Female offspring exposed to maternal obesity and DHT displayed reproductive dysfunction and anxiety-like behavior. Fecal microbiota transplantation from DHT and diet-induced obesity exposed female offspring to wild-type mice did not transfer reproductive dysfunction and did not cause the expected increase in anxiety-like behavior in recipients. Maternal obesity and androgen exposure affect the gut microbiome of offspring, but the disrupted estrous cycles and anxiety-like behavior are likely not microbiome-mediated.  

Usage Notes

Location

Sweden
Austria