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Data from: Evolutionary stasis despite selection on a heritable trait in an invasive zooplankton

Citation

Miehls, Andrea L.J. et al. (2015), Data from: Evolutionary stasis despite selection on a heritable trait in an invasive zooplankton, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7kp78

Abstract

Invasive species are one of the greatest threats to ecosystems and there is evidence that evolution plays an important role in the success or failure of invasions. Yet, few studies have measured natural selection and evolutionary responses to selection in invasive species, particularly invasive animals. We quantified the strength of natural selection on the defensive morphology (distal spine) of an invasive zooplankton, Bythotrephes longimanus, in Lake Michigan across multiple months during three growing seasons. We used multiple lines of evidence, including historic and contemporary wild-captured individuals and paleoecology of retrieved spines, to assess phenotypic change in distal spine length since invasion. We found evidence of temporally variable selection, with selection for decreased distal spine length early in the growing season and selection for increased distal spine length later in the season. This trend in natural selection is consistent with seasonal changes in the relative strength of non-gape-limited and gape-limited fish predation. Yet, despite net selection for increased distal spine length and a known genetic basis for distal spine length, we observed little evidence of an evolutionary response to selection. Multiple factors likely limit an evolutionary response to selection, including genetic correlations, trade-offs between components of fitness, and phenotypic plasticity.

Usage Notes

Location

Lake Michigan