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Data from: Automated size selection for short cell-free DNA fragments enriches for circulating tumor DNA and improves error correction during next generation sequencing

Citation

Hellwig, Sabine et al. (2019), Data from: Automated size selection for short cell-free DNA fragments enriches for circulating tumor DNA and improves error correction during next generation sequencing, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7pj51v0

Abstract

Circulating tumor-derived cell-free DNA (ctDNA) enables non-invasive diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment susceptibility testing in human cancers. However, accurate detection of variant alleles, particularly during untargeted searches, remains a principal obstacle to widespread application of cell-free DNA in clinical oncology. In this study, isolation of short cell-free DNA fragments is shown to enrich for tumor variants and improve correction of PCR- and sequencing-associated errors. Subfractions of the mononucleosome of circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) were isolated from patients with melanoma, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and colorectal adenocarcinoma using a high-throughput-capable automated gel-extraction platform. Using a 128-gene (128 kb) custom next-generation sequencing panel, variant alleles were on average 2-fold enriched in the short fraction (median insert size: ~142 bp) compared to the original ccfDNA sample, while 0.7-fold reduced in the fraction corresponding to the principal peak of the mononucleosome (median insert size: ~167 bp). Size-selected short fractions compared to the original ccfDNA yielded significantly larger family sizes (i.e., PCR duplicates) during in silico consensus sequence interpretation via unique molecular identifiers. Increments in family size were associated with a progressive reduction of PCR and sequencing errors. Although consensus read depth also decreased at larger family sizes, the variant allele frequency in the short ccfDNA fraction remained consistent, while variant detection in the original ccfDNA was commonly lost at family sizes necessary to minimize errors. These collective findings support the automated extraction of short ccfDNA fragments to enrich for ctDNA while concomitantly reducing false positives through in silico error correction.

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