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Data from: Corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency independently predicts mortality in septic shock

Citation

Meyer, Emily (2022), Data from: Corticosteroid-binding globulin deficiency independently predicts mortality in septic shock, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7pvmcvdvd

Abstract

Context Hydrocortisone administration in septic shock remains controversial. Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) transports cortisol to inflammatory sites and is depleted in septic shock. Objective To determine if severely deficient serum CBG <200 nmol/L (Ref range 269-641 nmol/L) independently predicts septic shock mortality. Methods A prospective observational study in patients with septic shock. Patients were categorised into two groups: mean plasma CBG concentrations <200 nmol/L and ≥200 nmol/L (day 1/2), with additional categorisation by nadir CBG. Primary outcome was ICU mortality. Secondary outcomes were 28- and 90-day mortality, norepinephrine requirements, renal-replacement therapy, and clinician-instituted hydrocortisone. Results 135 patients were included. Mortality rates in ICU were higher in the CBG <200 nmol/L vs the CBG ≥200 nmol/L group: 32.4% vs 13.9%; Odds ratio (OR), 2.97, (95% confidence intervals (CI) 1.19,7.41); P=0.02: 28-days; OR 2.25 (95% CI 0.99,5.11): 90-days; OR 2.21 (95% CI 0.99,4.91). Multivariate analysis revealed 4 factors independently associated with ICU mortality: CBG <200 nmol/L (OR 3.23, 95% CI 1.06,9.88), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II >25 (OR 3.58, 95% CI 1.20,10.68); SOFA liver score (OR 1.98, 95% CI 1.04,3.72); and renal-replacement therapy (OR 6.59, 95% CI 2.17,20.01). Nadir CBG levels were associated with higher SOFA cardiovascular scores, norepinephrine total dose (ug) P<0.01 and duration (days) P<0.01. Plasma cortisol concentrations and hydrocortisone administration did not relate to ICU mortality. Conclusion Septic shock patients with CBG <200 nmol/L had higher norepinephrine requirements and 3.2-fold higher ICU mortality. CBG concentration was the only directly reversible independent mortality risk factor.