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Data from: Getting there and around: host range oscillations during colonisation of the Canary Islands by the parasitic nematode Spauligodon

Citation

Jorge, Fátima et al. (2017), Data from: Getting there and around: host range oscillations during colonisation of the Canary Islands by the parasitic nematode Spauligodon, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7q523

Abstract

Episodes of expansion and isolation in geographic range over space and time, during which parasites have the opportunity to expand their host range, are linked to the development of host-parasite mosaic assemblages and parasite diversification. In this study we investigated whether island colonisation events lead to host range oscillations in a taxon of host-specific parasitic nematodes of the genus Spauligodon in the Canary Islands. We further investigated if range oscillations also resulted in shifts in host breadth (i.e. specialization), as expected for parasites on islands. Parasite phylogeny and divergence time estimates were inferred from molecular data with Bayesian methods. Host divergence times were set as calibration priors after a priori evaluation with a global-fit method of which individual host-parasite associations likely represent cospeciation links. Parasite colonisation history was reconstructed, followed by an estimation of oscillation events and specificity level. The results indicate the presence of four Spauligodon clades in the Canary Islands, which originated from at least three different colonisation events. We found evidence of host range oscillations to truly novel hosts, which in one case led to higher diversification. Contemporary host-parasite associations show strong host specificity, suggesting that changes in host breadth were limited to the shift period. Lineages with more frequent and wider taxonomic host range oscillations prior to the initial colonisation event showed wider range oscillations during colonisation and diversification within the archipelago. Our results suggest that a lineage’s evolutionary past may be the best indicator of a parasite’s potential for future range expansions.

Usage Notes

Location

Canary Islands