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Data from: The guantitative genetics of sexually selected traits, preferred traits and preference: a review and analysis of the data

Citation

Prokuda, Alexandra Y.; Roff, Derek A. (2014), Data from: The guantitative genetics of sexually selected traits, preferred traits and preference: a review and analysis of the data, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7tv47

Abstract

The maintenance of variation in sexually selected traits is a puzzle that has received increasing attention in the past several decades. Traits that are related to fitness, such as life-history or sexually selected traits, are expected to have low additive genetic variance (and hence, heritability) due to the rapid fixation of advantageous alleles. However, previous analyses have suggested that the heritabilities of sexually selected traits are on average higher than nonsexually selected traits. We show that the heritabilities of sexually selected traits are not significantly different from those of nonsexually selected traits overall or when separated into the three trait categories: behavioural, morphological and physiological. In contrast with previous findings, the heritability of preference is quite low (h2 = 0.25 ± 0.06) and is in the same range as life-history traits. We distinguish preferred traits as a category of sexually selected traits and find that the heritability of the former is not significantly different than sexually selected traits overall (0.48 ± 0.04 vs. 0.46 ± 0.03). We test the hypothesis that the heritability of sexually selected traits is negatively correlated with the strength of sexual selection. As predicted, there is a significant negative correlation between the heritabilities of sexually selected traits and the strength of selection. This suggests that heritabilities do indeed decrease as sexual selection increases but sexual selection is not strong enough to cause heritabilities of sexually selected traits to deviate from the same type of nonsexually selected traits.

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