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Data from: Multiple aspects of the selfing syndrome of the morning glory Ipomoea lacunosa evolved in response to selection: a Qst-Fst comparison

Citation

Rifkin, Joanna L.; Liao, Irene T.; Castillo, Allan S.; Rausher, Mark D. (2019), Data from: Multiple aspects of the selfing syndrome of the morning glory Ipomoea lacunosa evolved in response to selection: a Qst-Fst comparison, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.7vs53cr

Abstract

The frequent transition from outcrossing to selfing in flowering plants is often accompanied by changes in multiple aspects of floral morphology, termed the “selfing syndrome.” While the repeated evolution of these changes suggests a role for natural selection, genetic drift may also be responsible. To determine whether selection or drift shaped different aspects of the pollination syndrome and mating system in the highly selfing morning glory Ipomoea lacunosa, we performed multivariate and univariate Qst-Fst comparisons using a wide sample of populations of I. lacunosa and its mixed-mating sister species I. cordatotriloba. The two species differ in early growth, floral display, inflorescence, corolla size, nectar, and pollen number. Our analyses support a role for natural selection driving trait divergence, specifically in corolla size and nectar traits, but not in early growth, display size, inflorescence size, or pollen traits. We also find evidence of selection for reduced herkogamy in I. lacunosa, consistent with selection driving both the transition in mating system and the correlated floral changes. Our research demonstrates that while some aspects of the selfing syndrome evolved in response to selection, others likely evolved due to drift or correlated selection, and the balance between these forces may vary across selfing species.

Usage Notes

Location

Southeastern United States