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Data from: Fine‐scale geographic patterns of gene flow and reproductive character displacement in drosophila subquinaria and d. recens

Citation

Dyer, Kelly A. et al. (2018), Data from: Fine‐scale geographic patterns of gene flow and reproductive character displacement in drosophila subquinaria and d. recens, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.80c3q54

Abstract

When two species are incompletely isolated, strengthening premating isolation barriers in response to the production of low fitness hybrids may complete the speciation process. Here we use the sister species Drosophila subquinaria and D. recens to study the conditions under which this reinforcement of species boundaries occurs in natural populations. We first extend the region of known sympatry between these species, and then we conduct a fine-scale geographic survey of mate discrimination coupled with estimates of gene flow within and admixture between species. Within D. subquinaria reinforcement is extremely effective: we find variation in mate discrimination both against D. recens males as well as against conspecific allopatric males on the scale of a few kilometers and in the face of gene flow both from conspecific populations and introgression from D. recens. In D. recens we do not find evidence for increased mate discrimination in sympatry, even where D. recens is rare, consistent with substantial gene flow throughout the species’ range. Finally, we find that introgression between species is asymmetric, with more from D. recens into D. subquinaria than vice versa. Within each species admixture is highest in the geographic region where it is rare relative to the other species, suggesting that when hybrids are produced they are of low fitness. In sum, reinforcement within D. subquinaria is effective at maintaining species boundaries, but even when reinforcing selection is strong it may not always result in a pattern of strong reproductive character displacement due to variation in the frequency of hybridization and gene flow from neighboring populations.

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1149350, DEB-1110462

Location

North America