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Shared geographic histories and dispersal contribute to congruent phylogenies between amphipods and their microsporidian parasites at regional and global scales

Citation

Park, Eunji; Jorge, Fátima; Poulin, Robert (2020), Shared geographic histories and dispersal contribute to congruent phylogenies between amphipods and their microsporidian parasites at regional and global scales, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.83bk3j9pb

Abstract

In parasites that strongly rely on a host for dispersal, geographic barriers that act on the host will simultaneously influence parasite distribution as well. If their association persists over macroevolutionary time it may result in congruent phylogenetic and phylogeographic patterns due to shared geographic histories. Here, we investigated the level of congruent evolutionary history at a regional and global scale in a highly specialised parasite taxon infecting hosts with limited dispersal abilities: the microsporidians Dictyocoela spp. and their amphipod hosts. Dictyocoela can be transmitted both vertically and horizontally and is the most common microsporidian genus occurring in amphipods in Eurasia. However, little is known about its distribution elsewhere. We started by conducting molecular screening to detect microsporidian parasites in endemic amphipod species in New Zealand; based on phylogenetic analyses, we identified nine species-level microsporidian taxa including six belonging to Dictyocoela. With a distance-based cophylogenetic analysis at the regional scale, we identified overall congruent phylogenies between Paracalliope, the most common New Zealand freshwater amphipod taxon, and their Dictyocoela parasites. Also, hosts and parasites showed similar phylogeographic patterns suggesting shared biogeographic histories. Similarly, at a global scale, phylogenies of amphipod hosts and their Dictyocoela parasites showed broadly congruent phylogenies. The observed patterns may have resulted from covicariance and/or codispersal, suggesting that the intimate association between amphipods and Dictyocoela may have persisted over macroevolutionary time. We highlight that shared biogeographic histories could play a role in the codiversification of hosts and parasites at a macroevolutionary scale.

Methods

Nucleotide sequences used in these alignment files were obtained from GenBank or generated by the authors. All the sequences used here are available in GenBank. Please see Appendix_2 of the manuscript for further information.

Funding

University of Otago