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Data from: Temperature-dependent growth and fission rate plasticity drive seasonal and geographic changes in body size in a clonal sea anemone

Citation

Ryan, Will H. (2017), Data from: Temperature-dependent growth and fission rate plasticity drive seasonal and geographic changes in body size in a clonal sea anemone, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.83h1h

Abstract

The temperature-size rule is a commonly observed pattern where adult body size is negatively correlated with developmental temperature. In part, this may occur as a consequence of allometric scaling, where changes in the ratio of surface area to mass limit oxygen diffusion as body size increases. As oxygen demand increases with temperature, a smaller body should be favored as temperature increases. For clonal animals, small changes in growth and/or fission rate can rapidly alter the average body size of clonal descendants. Here I test the hypothesis that the clonal sea anemone Diadumene lineata is able to track an optimal body size through seasonal temperature changes using fission rate plasticity. Individuals from three regions (Florida, Georgia, and Massachusetts) across the species’ latitudinal range were grown in a year-long reciprocal common garden experiment mimicking seasonal temperature changes at three sites. Average body size was found to be smaller and fission rates higher in warmer conditions, consistent with the temperature-size rule pattern. However, seasonal size and fission patterns reflect a complex interaction between region-specific thermal reaction norms and the local temperature regime. These details provide insight into both the range of conditions required for oxygen limitation to contribute to a negative correlation between body size and temperature and the role that fission rate plasticity can play in tracking a rapidly changing optimal phenotype.

Usage Notes

Location

US east coast