Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: Coevolution of male mating signal and female preference during early lineage divergence of the Hawaiian cricket, Laupala cerasina

Citation

Grace, Jaime L; Shaw, Kerry L (2011), Data from: Coevolution of male mating signal and female preference during early lineage divergence of the Hawaiian cricket, Laupala cerasina, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.8645

Abstract

Sexual selection is a powerful evolutionary force shaping mate choice phenotypes, initiating phenotypic shifts resulting in (or reinforcing) population divergence and speciation when such shifts reduce mating probabilities among divergent populations. In the Hawaiian cricket genus Laupala, pulse rate of male calling song, a conspicuous mating signal, differs among species, potentially behaving as a speciation phenotype. Populations of the widespread species L. cerasina show variation in pulse rate. We document the degree of population differentiation in three features of calling song: pulse rate, pulse duration, and carrier frequency. All show significant population differentiation, with pulse rate showing the greatest heterogeneity. A Mantel test found no relationship between geographic distance and pulse rate divergence, indicating that a simple model of greater divergence with increasing distance cannot explain the observed pattern of differentiation. We demonstrate that female preference functions for pulse rate are unimodal, and that preference means show significant differentiation among populations. Furthermore, estimates of pulse rate preference correlate significantly with mean pulse rates across populations, indicating song and preference coevolve in a stepwise manner. This correlated divergence between signal and preference suggests that sexual selection facilitates the establishment of sexual isolation, reduced gene flow, and population differentiation, prerequisites for speciation.

Usage Notes

Location

Hawaii
Big Island