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Data from: Selective disappearance of individuals with high levels of glycated haemoglobin in a free-living bird

Citation

Récapet, Charlotte et al. (2016), Data from: Selective disappearance of individuals with high levels of glycated haemoglobin in a free-living bird, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.87035

Abstract

Although disruption of glucose homeostasis is a hallmark of ageing in humans and laboratory model organisms, we have little information on the importance of this process in free-living animals. Poor control of blood glucose levels leads to irreversible protein glycation. Hence, levels of protein glycation are hypothesized to increase with age and to be associated with a decline in survival. We tested these predictions by measuring blood glycated haemoglobin in 274 adult collared flycatchers of known age and estimating individual probability of recapture in the following 2 years. Results show a strong decrease in glycated haemoglobin from age 1 to 5 years and an increase thereafter. Individuals with high levels of glycated haemoglobin had a lower probability of recapture, even after controlling for effects of age and dispersal. Altogether, our findings suggest that poor control of glucose homoeostasis is associated with lower survival in this free-living bird population, and that the selective disappearance of individuals with the highest glycation levels could account for the counterintuitive age-related decline in glycated haemoglobin in the early age categories.

Usage Notes

Location

Gotland Island
Sweden