Skip to main content
Dryad logo

Data from: The predictability of genomic changes underlying a recent host shift in Melissa blue butterflies

Citation

Chaturvedi, Samridhi et al. (2018), Data from: The predictability of genomic changes underlying a recent host shift in Melissa blue butterflies, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.87ht5v0

Abstract

Despite accumulating evidence that evolution can be predictable, studies quantifying the predictability of evolution remain rare. Here, we measured the predictability of genome-wide evolutionary changes associated with a recent host shift in the Melissa blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa). We asked whether and to what extent genome-wide patterns of evolutionary change in nature could be predicted (1) by comparisons among instances of repeated evolution, and (2) from SNP $\times$ performance associations in a lab experiment. We delineated the genetic loci (SNPs) most strongly associated with host use in two L. melissa lineages that colonized alfalfa. Whereas most SNPs were strongly associated with host use in none or one of these lineages, we detected a ~two-fold excess of SNPs associated with host use in both lineages. Similarly, we found that host-associated SNPs in nature could also be partially predicted from SNP $\times$ performance (survival and weight) associations in a lab rearing experiment. But the extent of overlap, and thus degree of predictability, was somewhat reduced. Although we were able to predict (to a modest extent) the SNPs most strongly associated with host use in nature (in terms of parallelism and from the experiment), we had little to no ability to predict the direction of evolutionary change during the colonization of alfalfa. Our results show that different aspects of evolution associated with recent adaptation can be more or less predictable, and highlight how stochastic and deterministic processes interact to drive patterns of genome-wide evolutionary change

Usage Notes

Funding

National Science Foundation, Award: DEB-1638768