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Data from: A treefrog with reproductive mode plasticity reveals a changing balance of selection for non-aquatic egg-laying

Citation

Touchon, Justin C. (2012), Data from: A treefrog with reproductive mode plasticity reveals a changing balance of selection for non-aquatic egg-laying, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.8j1hb

Abstract

Non-aquatic reproduction has evolved repeatedly, but the factors that select for laying eggs on land are not well understood. The treefrog Dendropsophus ebraccatus has plasticity in reproductive mode, laying eggs that successfully develop in or out of water. This permits the first experimental comparison of the selective agents that shape adult oviposition behavior and embryo developmental capacity. I quantified the sources and strength of arboreal and aquatic egg mortality, how mortality varies with weather patterns, and assessed 39 years of daily rainfall patterns to infer historic levels of egg mortality and effects of climate change on the selective balance between aquatic and non-aquatic egg deposition. Aquatic predators and desiccation were the strongest selective agents in water and air, respectively. Egg mortality varied with weather such that aquatic oviposition was advantageous when rainfall was low, but laying eggs out of water increased survival when rainfall was high. Additionally, I found that since 1972 there have been significant changes in the patterns of rainfall in central Panama, which has altered the selective landscape acting on egg-laying behavior. This work provides insight into both the evolution and maintenance of adaptive phenotypic plasticity as well as historic and current selection on reproduction.

Usage Notes

Location

Central America
Gamboa
Panama