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Data from: Tracheostomy and long-term mortality in ICU patients undergoing prolonged mechanical ventilation

Citation

Cinotti, Raphael et al. (2019), Data from: Tracheostomy and long-term mortality in ICU patients undergoing prolonged mechanical ventilation, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.8t3g361

Abstract

Introduction. In critically ill patients undergoing prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV), the difference in long-term outcomes between patients with or without tracheostomy remains unexplored. Methods. Ancillary study of a prospective international multicentre observational cohort in 21 centres in France and Belgium, including 2087 patients, with a one-year follow-up after admission. We included patients with a MV duration ≥10 days, with or without tracheostomy. We explored the one-year mortality with a classical Cox regression model (adjustment on age, SAPS II, baseline diagnosis and withdrawal of life-sustaining therapies) and a Cox regression model using tracheostomy as a time-dependant variable. Results. 29.5% patients underwent prolonged MV, out of which 25.6% received tracheostomy and 74.4% did not. At one-year, 45.2% patients had died in the tracheostomy group and 51.5% patients had died in the group without tracheostomy (p=0.001). In the Cox-adjusted regression model, tracheostomy was not associated with improved one-year outcome (HR CI95 0.7 [0.5-1.001], p=0.051), as well as in the model using tracheostomy as a time-dependent variable (OR CI 95 1 [0.7-1.4], p=0.9). Conclusions. In our study, there was no statistically significant difference in the one-year mortality of patients undergoing prolonged MV when receiving tracheostomy or not.

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