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Data from: Decreased cerebrospinal fluid orexin levels not associated with clinical sleep disturbance in Parkinson’s disease: A retrospective study

Cite this dataset

Ogawa, Takuya et al. (2023). Data from: Decreased cerebrospinal fluid orexin levels not associated with clinical sleep disturbance in Parkinson’s disease: A retrospective study [Dataset]. Dryad. https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.905qfttq0

Abstract

Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) often suffer from sleep disturbances, including excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). These symptoms are also experienced by patients with narcolepsy, which is characterized by orexin neuronal loss. In PD, a decrease in orexin neurons is observed pathologically, but the association between sleep disturbance in PD and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) orexin levels is still unclear. This study aimed to clarify the role of orexin as a biomarker in patients with PD.

CSF samples were obtained from a previous cohort study conducted between 2015 and 2020. We cross-sectionally and longitudinally examined the association between CSF orexin levels, sleep, and clinical characteristics.

We analyzed 78 CSF samples from 58 patients with PD and 21 samples from controls. CSF orexin levels in patients with PD (median = 272.0 [interquartile range = 221.7–334.5] pg/mL) were lower than those in controls (352.2 [296.2–399.5] pg/mL, p = 0.007). There were no significant differences in CSF orexin levels according to EDS, RBD, or the use of dopamine agonists. Moreover, no significant correlation was observed between CSF orexin levels and clinical characteristics by multiple linear regression analysis. Furthermore, the longitudinal changes in orexin levels were also not correlated with clinical characteristics.

This study showed decreased CSF orexin levels in patients with PD, but these levels did not show any correlation with any clinical characteristics. Our results suggest the limited efficacy of CSF orexin levels as a biomarker for PD, and that sleep disturbances may also be affected by dysfunction of the nervous system other than orexin, or by dopaminergic treatments in PD. Understanding the reciprocal role of orexin among other neurotransmitters may provide a better treatment strategy for sleep disturbance in patients with PD.

Funding

Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Award: 19K08037

Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, Award: JP19dm0908001

Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, Award: JP20dm0107162

Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development, Award: JP21zf0127005

Research on Policy Planning and Evaluation for Rare and Intractable Diseases, Health, Labour and Welfare Sciences, Award: 20FC1049

Research Committee of Central Nervous System Degenerative Diseases, Award: 20FC1049