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Data from: Honey bee dietary neonicotinoid exposure is associated with pollen collection from agricultural weeds

Citation

Wood, Thomas; Kaplan, Ian; Zhang, Yajun; Szendrei, Zsofia (2019), Data from: Honey bee dietary neonicotinoid exposure is associated with pollen collection from agricultural weeds, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.913qd93

Abstract

Neonicotinoid insecticides have been linked to bee declines. However, tracking the primary exposure route for bees in the field has proven to be a major logistical challenge, impeding efforts to restore pollinator health in agricultural landscapes. We quantified neonicotinoid concentrations and botanical species composition in 357 pollen samples collected from 114 commercial honey bee colonies placed along a gradient of agricultural intensity between June and September. Neonicotinoid concentrations increased through the season, peaking at the end of August. As a result, concentrations in pollen were negatively associated with collection from woody and crop plants that flower early-mid season, and positively associated with collection from herbaceous plants that flower mid-late season. Higher clothianidin and thiamethoxam residues were correlated with samples containing a greater proportion of pollen collected from agricultural weeds. The percentage of agricultural land within 1,500 m was positively correlated with thiamethoxam concentration; however, this spatial relationship was far weaker than the relationship with the proportion of pollen collected from herbaceous plants. These results indicate that both plant species identity and agricultural dominance are important in determining honey bee neonicotinoid exposure through the pollen diet, but that uncultivated plants associated with agriculture are the source of the greatest acute exposure.

Usage Notes

Location

Michigan