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Data from: Self-reported functional status predicts post-operative outcomes in non-cardiac surgery patients with pulmonary hypertension

Citation

Shah, Aalap C. et al. (2019), Data from: Self-reported functional status predicts post-operative outcomes in non-cardiac surgery patients with pulmonary hypertension, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.9236ng5

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pulmonary hypertension (PHTN) is associated with increased post-procedure morbidity and mortality. Pre-procedure echocardiography (ECHO) is a widely used tool for evaluation of these patients, but its accuracy in predicting post-procedure outcomes is unproven. Self-reported exercise tolerance has not been evaluated for operative risk stratification of PHTN patients. OBJECTIVE: We analyzed whether self-reported exercise tolerance predicts outcomes (hospi-tal length-of-stay [LOS], mortality and morbidity) in PHTN patients (WHO Class I - V) under-going anesthesia and surgery. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We reviewed 550 non-cardiac, non-obstetric procedures per-formed on 370 PHTN patients at a single institution between 2007 and 2013. All patients had cardiac ECHO documented within 1 year prior to the procedure. Pre-procedure comorbidities and ECHO data were collected. Functional status (< or ? 4 metabolic equivalents of task [METs]) was assigned based on responses to standard patient interview questions during the pre-anesthesia clinic visit. Multiple logistic regression was used to develop a risk score model (Pul-monary Hypertension Outcome Risk Score; PHORS) and determine its value in predicting post-procedure outcomes. In an adjusted model, functional status <4 METs was independently associ-ated with a LOS >7 days (p < .003), as were higher ASA class (p < .002), open surgical approach (p < .002), procedure duration > 2 hours (p < .001), and the absence of systemic hypertension (p = .012). PHORS Score ?2 was associated with an increased 30-day major complication rate (28.7% vs. 19.2%; p < 0.001) and ICU admission rate (8.6% s 2.8%; p = .007), but no statistical difference in hospital readmissions rate (17.6% vs. 14.0%; p = .29), or mortality (3.5% vs. 1.4%; p = .75). Similar ECHO findings did not further improve outcome prediction. CONCLUSIONS: Poor functional status is associated with severe PHTN and predicts increased LOS and post-procedure complications in patients with moderate to severe pulmonary hyperten-sion with different etiologies. A risk assessment model predicts increased LOS with fair accura-cy. A thorough evaluation of underlying etiologies of PHTN should be undertaken in every pa-tient.

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Location

Seattle
WA