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Data from: Twentieth-century changes in the genetic composition of Swedish field pea metapopulations

Citation

Hagenblad, Jenny; Leino, Matti W.; Boström, Erik (2012), Data from: Twentieth-century changes in the genetic composition of Swedish field pea metapopulations, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.92p3p

Abstract

Landrace crops are formed by local adaptation, genetic drift and gene flow through seed exchange. In reverse, the study of genetic structure between landrace populations can reveal the effects of these forces over time. We present here the analysis of genetic diversity in 40 Swedish field pea (Pisum sativum L.) populations, either available as historical seed samples from the late nineteenth century or as extant gene bank accessions assembled in the late twentieth century. The historical material shows constant high levels of within-population diversity, whereas the extant accessions show varying, and overall lower, levels of within-population diversity. Structure and principal component analysis cluster most accessions, both extant and historical, in groups after geographical origin. County-wise analyses of the accessions show that the genetic diversity of the historical accessions is largely overlapping. In contrast, most extant accessions show signs of genetic drift. They harbor a subset of the alleles found in the historical accessions and are more differentiated from each other. These results reflect how, historically present metapopulations have been preserved during the twentieth century, although as genetically isolated populations.

Usage Notes

Location

Sweden