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Data from: Sexual selection on male body size, genital length and heterozygosity: consistency across habitats and social settings

Citation

Head, Megan L. et al. (2018), Data from: Sexual selection on male body size, genital length and heterozygosity: consistency across habitats and social settings, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.93351

Abstract

1. Spatial and temporal variation in environmental factors and the social setting can help to maintain genetic variation in sexually selected traits if it affects the strength of directional selection. A key social parameter which affects the intensity of, and sometimes predicts the response to, mating competition is the operational sex ratio (OSR; ratio of receptive males to females). 2. How the OSR affects selection for specific male traits is poorly understood. It is also unclear how sexual selection is affected by interactions between the OSR and environmental factors, such as habitat complexity, that alter key male-female interactions such as mate encounter rates. 3. Here, we experimentally manipulated the OSR and habitat complexity and quantified sexual selection on male mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) by directly measuring male reproductive success (i.e. paternity). 4. We show that, despite a more equitable sharing of paternity (i.e. higher levels of multiple paternity) under a male-biased OSR, selection on focal male traits was unaffected by the OSR or habitat complexity. Instead, sexual selection consistently, and significantly, favoured smaller bodied males, males with higher genome wide heterozygosity (based on >3000 SNP markers), and males with a relatively long gonopodium (intromittent organ).

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