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Data from: The influence of pollinator phylogeography and mate preference on floral divergence in a sexually deceptive daisy

Citation

De Jager, Marinus L.; Ellis, Allan G. (2013), Data from: The influence of pollinator phylogeography and mate preference on floral divergence in a sexually deceptive daisy, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.9ck52

Abstract

Divergent mate preferences and subsequent genetic differentiation between populations has been demonstrated, but its effects on interspecific interactions are unknown. Associated species exploiting these mate preferences, for example, may diverge to match local preferences. We explore this idea in the sexually deceptive, fly-mimicking daisy, Gorteria diffusa, by testing for association between genetic structure in the fly pollinator (a proxy for mate preference divergence) and geographic divergence in floral form. If genetic structure in flies influences interactions with G. diffusa, we expect phylogeographically distinct flies to be associated with different floral forms. Flies associated with forms exploiting only feeding behaviour often belonged to several phylogeographic clades, while flies associated with forms exploiting male mating behaviour always belonged to distinct clades, indicating the possibility of pollinator-mediated floral divergence through phylogeographic variation in mating preferences of male flies. We tested this hypothesis with reciprocal presentations using male flies from distinct clades associated with separate floral forms. Results show that males from all clades exhibit similar preferences, making pollinator driven divergence through geographic variation in mate preference unlikely. Males, however, showed evidence of learned resistance to deceptive traits, suggesting antagonistic interactions between plants and pollinators may drive deceptive floral trait evolution in G. diffusa.

Usage Notes

Location

Northern Cape
South Africa
Namaqualand