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Baculum shape and paternity success in house mice: evidence for genital coevolution

Citation

André, Gonçalo I.; Firman, Renee C.; Simmons, Leigh W. (2021), Baculum shape and paternity success in house mice: evidence for genital coevolution , Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.9ghx3fff1

Abstract

Sexual selection is believed to be responsible for the rapid divergence of male genitalia, which is a widely observed phenomenon across different taxa. Among mammals, the stimulatory role of male genitalia and female ‘sensory perception’ has been suggested to explain these evolutionary patterns. Recent research on house mice has shown that baculum (penis bone) shape can respond to experimentally imposed sexual selection. Here, we explore the adaptive value of baculum shape by performing two experiments that examine the effects of male and female genitalia on male reproductive success. Thus, we selected house mice (Mus musculus domesticus) from families characterised by extremes in baculum shape (relative width) and examined paternity success in both non-competitive (monogamous) and competitive (polyandrous) contexts. Our analyses revealed that the relative baculum shape of competing males influenced competitive paternity success, but that this effect was dependent on the breeding value for baculum shape of the family from which females were derived. Our data provide novel insight into the potential role of sexual selected on the coevolution of the house mouse baculum and lend support to the stimulatory hypothesis for mammalian genital evolution.

Methods

Dataset 1-6: Landmarks were placed around the periphery of the baculum (36 sliding, 4 fixed) and relative warps (RWs) and centroid size were extracted. Landmark placement conducted using tpsDig 232 developed by Rohlf.

Dataset 7-8: Methodology explained in detail in the paper.

Usage Notes

Dataset 1: Landmark data from second-generation laboratory-reared house mice.

Dataset 2: Landmark data from second-generation laboratory-reared house mice used for the monoandrous mating experiment. Specimen number (ID) can be matched with ID at the excel spreadsheet from Dataset 7.

Dataset 3: Landmark data from second-generation laboratory-reared house mice used to conduct a repeatability analysis. For the same individual, we have two sets of landmarks. Used to assess the repeatability of landmark placement. Specimen numbers/ID can be matched with ID at the Dataset 7

Dataset 4: Landmark data from third-generation laboratory-reared house mice. 

Dataset 5: Landmark data from third-generation laboratory-reared house mice used for the polyandrous mating experiment. Specimen number (ID) can be matched with ID at the excel spreadsheet from Dataset 8.

Dataset 6: Landmark data from third-generation laboratory-reared house mice used to conduct a repeatability analysis. For the same individual, we have two sets of landmarks. Used to assess the repeatability of landmark placement. Specimen numbers/ID can be matched with ID at the Dataset 8.

Dataset 7: Excel spreadsheet containing morphological data and identifiers of each individual for the second-generation laboratory reared house mice and monoandrous mating experiment. Dataset contains three different sheets representing data used for three different analysis. Second-generation sheet: data used to check if 2nd generation house mice aligned with the expected baculum shape extremes; Monoandrous experiment data: data used to conduct the statistical analysis on the monoandrous mating experiments; Second-generation Repeatibility: data used for the analysis of reliability of landmark placement and repeatability of our measurements.

Dataset 8: Excel spreadsheet containing morphological data and identifiers of each individual for the third-generation laboratory reared house mice and polyandrous mating experimentThird-generation sheet: data used to check if 3rd generation house mice aligned with the expected baculum shape extremes; Polyandrous experiment data: data used to conduct the statistical analysis on the polyandrous mating experiments; Third-generation Repeatibility: data used for the analysis of reliability of landmark placement and repeatability of our measurements.

Funding

Australian Research Council, Award: LWS DP 170101315