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Data from: Temporal factors and distance to human settlement affect nest survival of the endangered Yellow-headed Parrot in Belize, Central America

Citation

Tarazona, Fabio et al. (2022), Data from: Temporal factors and distance to human settlement affect nest survival of the endangered Yellow-headed Parrot in Belize, Central America, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.9kd51c5kb

Abstract

The endangered Yellow-headed Parrot (Amazona oratrix) has experienced a considerable reduction in abundance and distribution. Identifying natural and anthropogenic causes of nest failure is a critical step towards developing conservation actions that increase nest survival. In this study, we examined daily nest survival in relation to temporal, habitat and anthropogenic factors, as well as nest site properties. We monitored nests (n = 124) across six study sites in Belize during 2017 and 2018 and independently modeled the effects of predation, abandonment and poaching on daily nest survival rates. Overall, the estimated cumulative nest survival probability was 0.18 (95% CI = 0.12 – 0.25). Predation was the main cause of nest failure, followed by abandonment and poaching. Our results showed that nest predation and abandonment usually occurred early in the nesting cycle. Day within the nesting season negatively influenced daily survival for abandoned nests and had a quadratic effect on survival for poached nests. Poaching events occurred at a specific date range later in the season, with nests farther from the nearest human settlement having higher daily survival. Findings from this study highlight the additive mortality effect that nest poaching is having on Yellow-headed Parrot populations in Belize and show that managers can anticipate the timing and location of nests most vulnerable to poaching.

Methods

This data was collected by monitoring Yellow-headed Parrot (Amazona oratrix) nests during the 2017-2018 breeding seasons in Belize. Dataset includes nests that failed due to predation, abandonment and poaching, as well as nests that were successful during the two breeding seasons. Associated with them are covariates included in the models used to evaluate daily nest survival. Names of covariates follow those needed to perform survival analysis in RMark. 

Usage Notes

Dataset does not contain missing values. Please contact the author for any additional inquiries of how data was collected and analyzed.