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Data from: Genetic and morphological variation in sexual and asexual parasitoids of the genus Lysiphlebus: an apparent link between wing shape and reproductive mode

Citation

Petrović, Andjeljko et al. (2015), Data from: Genetic and morphological variation in sexual and asexual parasitoids of the genus Lysiphlebus: an apparent link between wing shape and reproductive mode, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.9t0g2

Abstract

Background Endoparasitoids of aphids belonging to the genus Lysiphlebus Foerster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Aphidiinae) comprise over 20 species that exploit over a hundred species of aphid hosts including many important pest aphid species. Within the genus Lysiphlebus two genetically and morphologically well defined species groups are recognized: the "fabarum" and the "testaceipes" group both including taxa with sexual (arrhenotoky) and asexual (thelytoky) reproduction modes. However the diverse patterns of morphological variation which include clearly distinguishable morphotypes and genetic variation within species groups are not yet resolved. To address the relationship between morphological evolution and genetic divergence in Lysiphlebus wasps we explored both genetic differentiation (mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences) and morphological variation (wing size and shape) and the changes in wing size and shape in the phylogenetic context. Results and Discussion Analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear gene sequences determine the separation of the genus into two species groups ("testaceipes" and "fabarum" groups) revealed three well defined phylogenetic lineages within "fabarum" species group including yet undefined species. Mapping wing shape data onto molecular phylogenetic indicated that the concordance between genetic diversification and divergence in the wing shape results from the deep split between two main species group. No association between pattern of genetic diversification morphotypes and wing shape variation within species groups was observed. The clear association between wing shape and reproductive mode was the most surprising result of our study. We propose two possible mutually non-exclusive mechanisms which may explain the link between reproductive mode and the shape of the wing Conclusions Combining molecular analysis with analysis of wing shape allows us determining existence of one cryptic yet undescribed species. At the same time we determine that Lysiphlebus fabarum group need detailed taxonomic revision because species boundaries as defined cannot be upheld. Mapping wing shape onto independently derived molecular phylogeny revealed that deep genetic divergence is associated with evolutionary changes in wing shape of Lysiphlebus wasps. Among most recently diverged taxa the morphological variation in the wing shape can be explained by the reproduction mode.

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Location

Europe
Serbia