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Data from: Experiencing El Niño conditions during early life reduces recruiting probabilities but not adult survival

Citation

Ancona, Sergio; Zúñiga-Vega, J. Jaime; Rodríguez, Cristina; Drummond, Hugh (2017), Data from: Experiencing El Niño conditions during early life reduces recruiting probabilities but not adult survival, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.9t3js

Abstract

In wild long-lived animals, analysis of impacts of stressful natal conditions on adult performance has rarely embraced the entire age-span, and the possibility that costs are expressed late in life has seldom been examined. Using 26 years of data from 8,541 fledglings and 1,310 adults of the blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii), a marine bird that can live up to 23 years, we tested whether experiencing the warm waters and food scarcity associated with El Niño in the natal year reduces recruitment or survival over the adult lifetime. Warm water in the natal year reduced the probability of recruiting; each additional degree (°C) of water temperature meant a reduction of roughly 50% in fledglings’ probability of returning to the natal colony as breeders. Warm water in the current year impacted adult survival, with greater effect at the oldest ages than during early adulthood. However, warm water in the natal year did not affect survival at any age over the adult lifespan. A previous study showed that early recruitment and widely spaced breeding allow boobies that experience warm waters in the natal year to achieve normal fledgling production over the first 10 years; our results now show that this reproductive effort incurs no survival penalty, not even late in life. This pattern is additional evidence of buffering against stressful natal conditions via life-history adjustments.

Usage Notes

Location

eastern tropical Pacific