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Data from: Evidence of weaker phenotypic plasticity by prey to novel cues from non-native predators

Citation

Hollander, Johan; Bourdeau, Paul E. (2017), Data from: Evidence of weaker phenotypic plasticity by prey to novel cues from non-native predators, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.b06f9

Abstract

A central question in evolutionary biology is how coevolutionary history between predator and prey influences their interactions. Contemporary global change and range expansion of exotic organisms impose a great challenge for prey species, which are increasingly exposed to invading non-native predators, with which they share no evolutionary history. Here, we complete a comprehensive survey of empirical studies of coevolved and naive predator−prey interactions to assess whether a shared evolutionary history with predators influences the magnitude of predator-induced defenses mounted by prey. Using marine bivalves and gastropods as model prey, we found that coevolved prey and predator-naive prey showed large discrepancies in magnitude of predator-induced phenotypic plasticity. Although naive prey, predominantly among bivalve species, did exhibit some level of plasticity – prey exposed to native predators showed significantly larger amounts of phenotypic plasticity. We discuss these results and the implications they may have for native communities and ecosystems.

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