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Data from: How a measure of tree structural complexity relates to architectural benefit-to-cost ratio, light availability and growth of trees

Citation

Seidel, Dominik et al. (2019), Data from: How a measure of tree structural complexity relates to architectural benefit-to-cost ratio, light availability and growth of trees, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.b1r6km8

Abstract

Aboveground tree architecture is neither fully deterministic nor random. It is likely the result of mechanisms that balance static requirements and light-capturing efficiency. Here we used terrestrial laser scanning data to investigate the relationship between tree architecture, here addressed using the box-dimension (Db), and the architectural benefit-to-cost ratio, the light availability and the growth of trees. We detected a clear relationship between Db and the benefit-to-cost ratio for the tested three temperate forest tree species (Fagus sylvatica L., Fraxinus excelsior L. and Acer pseudoplatanus L.). In addition, we could also show that Db is positively related to the growth performance of several tropical tree species. Finally, we observed a negative relationship between the strength of competition enforced on red oak (Quercus rubra L.) trees and their Db. We therefore argue that Db is a meaningful and integrative measure that describes the structural complexity of the aboveground compartments of a plant as well as its relation to structural efficiency (benefit-to-cost ratio), productivity and growing conditions (competition or availability of light).

Usage Notes

Location

Indonesia (Sumatra)
Germany