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Data from: Landscape simplification shapes pathogen prevalence in plant-pollinator networks

Citation

Figueroa, Laura et al. (2020), Data from: Landscape simplification shapes pathogen prevalence in plant-pollinator networks, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.b5mkkwh98

Abstract

Species interaction networks, which play an important role in determining pathogen transmission and spread in ecological communities, can shift in response to agricultural landscape simplification. However, we know surprisingly little about how landscape simplification-driven changes in network structure impact epidemiological patterns. Here, we combine mathematical modeling and data from eleven bipartite plant-pollinator networks observed along a landscape simplification gradient to elucidate how changes in network structure shape disease dynamics. Our empirical data show that landscape simplification reduces pathogen prevalence in bee communities via increased diet breadth of the dominant species. Furthermore, our empirical data and theoretical model indicate that increased connectance reduces the likelihood of a disease outbreak and decreases variance in prevalence among bee species in the community, resulting in a dilution effect. Because infectious diseases are implicated in pollinator declines worldwide, a better understanding of how land use change impacts species interactions is therefore critical for conserving pollinator health.

Funding

National Institutes of Health, Award: National Institute of General Medical Sciences, R01GM122062

National Science Foundation, Award: Graduate Research Fellowship DGE-1650441

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Award: GNE12-036

Garden Club of America, Award: Board of Associates Centennial Pollinator Fellowship

Atkinson Center for Sustainability, Award: Sustainable Biodiversity Fund

Atkinson Center for Sustainability, Award: Sustainable Biodiversity Fund