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Data From: Respiratory temperature responses of tropical conifers differ with leaf morphology

Citation

Schmiege, Stephanie et al. (2021), Data From: Respiratory temperature responses of tropical conifers differ with leaf morphology, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.b5mkkwhcz

Abstract

Photosynthetic traits suggest that shade tolerance may explain the contrasting success of two conifer taxa, Podocarpaceae and Pinaceae, in tropical forests. Needle-leaved species from Pinus (Pinaceae) are generally absent from tropical forests, while Pinus krempfii, a flat-leaved pine, and numerous flat-leaved Podocarpaceae are abundant. Respiration (R) traits may provide additional insight into the drivers of the contrasting success of needle- and flat-leaved conifers in tropical forests.  We measured the short-term respiratory temperature (RT) response between 10 – 50°C and foliar morphological traits of 3 needle- and 7 flat-leaved conifer species coexisting in a tropical montane forest in the Central Highlands of Vietnam containing notable conifer diversity. We fit a lognormal polynomial model to each RT curve and extracted the following three parameters: a (basal R), and b and c (together describing the shape of the response).  Needle-leaved species (Pinus kesiya, Pinus dalatensis and Dacrydium elatum) had higher rates of area-based R at 25°C (R25-area) as well as higher area-based modeled basal respiration (a) than flat-leaved species (P. krempfii, Podocarpus neriifolius, Dacrycarpus imbricatus, Nageia nana, Taxus wallichiana, Keteeleria evelyniana and Fokienia hodginsii).  No significant differences were found between needle- and flat-leaved species in mass-based R25 (R25-mass) or in the shape of the RT response (b and c); however, interspecific differences in R25-mass, R at nighttime temperature extremes (R4.1 & R20.6) and leaf traits were apparent.  Differences in R25-area and a suggest that needle-leaved foliage may be more energetically costly to maintain than flat-leaved foliage, providing new insight and additional support for the hypothesis that shade tolerance is an important driver of Podocarpaceae success and Pinaceae absence in the majority of tropical forests.  Interspecific differences in R25-mass and leaf traits highlight that varying ecological strategies are employed by conifers to coexist and survive in the Central Highlands of Vietnam. Ultimately, these data further our understanding of current conifer biogeographic distributions and underscore the need for additional studies to elucidate the effects of extreme temperature events on the continued survival of conifers in this unique forest.

Methods

Respiration temperature response curves were collected using an LI-6400XT modified to include a custom-built leaf chamber attached to a temperature controller. Leaf samples were collected from branches of upper canopies of adult trees of 10 conifer species growing in the Central Highlands of Vietnam in January 2018. Respiration temperature responses were measured from ~ 10 - 50 degrees celcius.  Full methods are available in the accompanying publication in Functional Ecology.

Usage Notes

ReadMe File includes column names, descriptions and units for each dataset.  Missing data, or data removed due to measurement error are denoted by "NA".

SSchmiege_master_results_Vietnam_RT.csv
All foliar traits included in the analysis.

SSchmiege_Vietnam_RTcurves_raw.csv
Output of the raw LI-6400XT respiration temperature response curves.

Funding

National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, Award: DGE-1644869

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Climate Center

Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, Award: Ashton Award

Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Climate Center

Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, Award: Ashton Award