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Data from: An origin of citations: Darwin's collaborators and their contributions to the Origin of Species

Citation

Navarro, Pedro L.; Machado, Cristina A. (2020), Data from: An origin of citations: Darwin's collaborators and their contributions to the Origin of Species, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.b678k40

Abstract

Since the first edition of the Origin of Species (1859), Charles Darwin apologizes for not correctly referencing all the works cited in his magnum opus. More than 150 years later we catalogued these citations and analysed the resultant data. Looking for a complete selection of collaborators, a flexibilization of the term “citation” was necessary, and we define it as any reference made to a third party, independently of its form or function. Following the same idea, the last edition of the Origin, originally published in 1872 and reprinted with minor additions and corrections in 1876, was chosen for the research because it represents the end of a long debate between Darwin and his peers, naturally being the edition with the most number of citations and collaborators. Through a diverse theoric approach we hope to present a new perspective for the study of the Origin of Species: a bibliographic approach gives us the tools needed to understand the history of the book as a physical and cultural object; bibliometrics provides a theory of citations as well as a quantitative analysis; lastly, the Science Studies highlight the profound social aspects of science in the making. The analysis resulted in 639 citations to 298 collaborators, although these results are only the tip of the iceberg of all the gathered data’s potential.

Methods

The data presented on these tables and our methodology are better discussed in the article "An Origin of citations: Darwin's collaborators and their contribution to the Origin of Species"

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