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Prevalence, injury-, and non-injury-related factors associated with anxiety and depression in polytrauma patients – A retrospective 20 year follow-up study

Citation

Halvachizadeh, Sascha (2020), Prevalence, injury-, and non-injury-related factors associated with anxiety and depression in polytrauma patients – A retrospective 20 year follow-up study, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.b8gtht78d

Abstract

Introduction

Survival rate after polytrauma increased over the past decades resulting in an increase of long-term complaints. These include physical and psychological impairments. The
aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and risk factors for developing depression and anxiety more than twenty years after polytrauma.

Methods

We contacted patients who were treated due to a polytrauma between 1973 and 1990 at one level 1 trauma centre after more than 20 years. These patients received a selfadministered questionnaire, to assess symptoms of depression and anxiety. Analysis based on multivariable logistic regression models include injury related and non-injury
related factors to determine risk factors associated with the development of depression and anxiety.

Results

Patients included in this study (n=337) had a mean ISS of 20.3 (4 to 50) points. In total, 173 (51.3%) showed psychiatric sequelae (depression n=163, 48.2%; anxiety n=14,
4.1%). None injury-related factors were associated with the development of depression or anxiety. However, the patients, who required psychiatric therapy prior to the injury
had higher risk of developing psychiatric symptoms (OR 1.3, 95%CI 1.1 to 1.8, p=0.018) as did patients who suffered from additional psychiatric insults after the injury
(OR 1.4, 95%CI 1.2 to 2.0, p=0.049).

Conclusion

More than half of polytrauma patients developed psychiatric sequelae. Risk factors mainly non-injury related factors such as psychiatric comorbidities and additional
psychiatric insults after the injuryIntroduction Survival rate after polytrauma increased over the past decades resulting in an increase of long-term complaints. These include physical and psychological impairments. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence and risk factors for developing depression and anxiety more than twenty years after polytrauma.

Methods

We contacted patients who were treated due to a polytrauma between 1973 and 1990 at one level 1 trauma centre after more than 20 years. These patients received a selfadministered questionnaire, to assess symptoms of depression and anxiety. Analysis based on multivariable logistic regression models include injury related and non-injury
related factors to determine risk factors associated with the development of depression and anxiety.

Results

Patients included in this study (n=337) had a mean ISS of 20.3 (4 to 50) points. In total, 173 (51.3%) showed psychiatric sequelae (depression n=163, 48.2%; anxiety n=14,
4.1%). None injury-related factors were associated with the development of depression or anxiety. However, the patients, who required psychiatric therapy prior to the injury
had higher risk of developing psychiatric symptoms (OR 1.3, 95%CI 1.1 to 1.8, p=0.018) as did patients who suffered from additional psychiatric insults after the injury
(OR 1.4, 95%CI 1.2 to 2.0, p=0.049).

Conclusion

More than half of polytrauma patients developed psychiatric sequelae. Risk factors mainly non-injury related factors such as psychiatric comorbidities and additional
psychiatric insults after the injury

Methods

Twenty years follow up and interveiw with written questionnaire