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Data from: The evolution of vertebrate eye size across an environmental gradient: phenotype does not predict genotype in a Trinidadian killifish

Citation

Beston, Shannon M.; Wostl, Elijah; Walsh, Matthew R. (2017), Data from: The evolution of vertebrate eye size across an environmental gradient: phenotype does not predict genotype in a Trinidadian killifish, Dryad, Dataset, https://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.b96j3

Abstract

Vertebrates exhibit substantial variation in eye size. Eye size correlates positively with visual capacity and behaviors that enhance fitness, such as predator avoidance. This foreshadows a connection between predation and eye size evolution. Yet, the conditions that favor evolutionary shifts in eye size, besides the well-known role for light availability, are unclear. We tested the influence of predation on the evolution of eye size in Trinidadian killifish, Rivulus hartii. Rivulus are located across a series of communities where they coexist with visually oriented piscivores (‘high predation’ sites), and no predators (‘Rivulus-only’ sites). Wild-caught Rivulus from high predation sites generally exhibited a smaller relative eye size than communities that lack predators. Yet, such differences were inconsistent across rivers. Second-generation common garden reared fish revealed repeatable decreases in eye size in Rivulus from high predation sites. We performed additional experiments that tested the importance of light and resources on eye size evolution. Sites that differ in light or resource availability did not differ in eye size. Our results argue that differences in predator-induced mortality underlie genetically-based shifts in vertebrate eye size. We discuss the drivers of eye size evolution in light of the nonparallel trends between the phenotypic and common garden results.

Usage Notes

Location

Trinidad